Tips from Seasoned Homeschool Moms

If you’re new to homeschooling, or still in the stage of considering having a go at it, the prospect can be daunting.  You look around at other homeschooling families, and they seem to have it all together, but we all started at the same spot you’re in right now….

In addition to these tips from fourteen seasoned moms, we’ve put together a packet of Homeschool Helps, including planners, graphic organizers, record logs, and templates to help you on your journey!  Snag this FREE packet here.

Melanie, from Raising Real Men, says…

  • Relax – introduce your little ones to the joy of learning in a gentle and realistic way.  K12, Epic, and other forms of online schooling are not the same as homeschooling.  These are run like the public schools, and are not a relaxed form of learning.
    • There is a new trend toward ‘home school charter schools,’ but this is also not true homeschooling.  This is more akin to sending your child to a private school.

Gwen, from Geez Gwen, says…

  • Homeschool is not a public school, and that’s the point. Do not try to recreate public school in your home. Embrace the opportunity to be flexible, to offer student directed lessons, and to be very hands on about the learning experience.

Charlene, from Hess Un-Academy, says…

Erin says…

  • There is secular and religious curriculum – make sure you know what you’re getting when you spend your money!  We’ve found that choosing one over the other isn’t a big deal, as it’s easy to adjust as needed, except when it comes to science.  Science is the subject where it makes the most difference.

Yvie, from Homeschool On the Range, says…

  • Keep a record of all the books you read for school, not just the textbooks / curricula.  This is especially important if you’re a Charlotte Mason or Unit Studies family.
  • Read aloud to your children…no matter their age.  The snuggles are priceless, and the books will often lead to soul-searching conversations with teens.  If you’re not sure where to start, check out The Read-Aloud Family.

DeeDee says…

  • If you don’t finish the full curriculum, don’t stress over it.  There’s so much overlap in the grades that missing some lessons at the end of the year doesn’t really matter.  What matters is finishing the year, taking time off to rest, and enjoying time with your children.

Dawn, from The Schoolin’ Swag Blog, says…

  • There is no one right or wrong curriculum. Take some time to decide what you want your children’s education to look like and find the curriculum that works for your family.  And remember, there will be hard days — this is not an easy task, but it is totally worth it.   {Fifty Reasons to be Thankful for Home School (on the Hard Days)}

Kym, from Homeschool Coffee Break, says…

  • Relationships are more important than academics. Your kids’ hearts are more important than their grades or achievements. You are the most qualified person to be in charge of your child’s education, because you love them more than anyone else (other than the Lord) and want the best for them. Be confident!

Nicole says…

  • I always hear “I’d never have the patience to homeschool my kids!,’ but people have the patience for whatever they want to do.  With five kids, I know all about those days when your patience is thin, but they’re your kids…and you love them.  If you want to have the patience, you will.

Emily, from Table Life Blog, says…

  • Trust your instincts.  You know your abilities and your kids better than anyone else. Your voice is the one you should trust the most!

Jennifer, from The Deliberate Mom, says…

  • Seek community. You are not on your own in this homeschooling journey! A helpful, inspiring homeschool community can do wonders for your morale. If you don’t belong to a homeschool community, there are many options available. You can join a local association, co-op, or even an encouraging online homeschool group.

Surya, from The Busy Mom Club, says…

  • Don’t be scared to change if something isn’t working. That’s one of the great things about homeschooling- you can change to suit you and your kids’ needs. You can change schedules, curriculum, topics, routines, anything…and it will all be just fine.

Holly says…

  • Follow your state’s graduation requirements.  There are usually multiple tracks – one for college-bound students and one for general education – and it is of the utmost importance that you follow them if your child is college-bound.

Beth says…